Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 14th World Congress on Virology and Infectious Diseases Tokyo, Japan.

Day 1 :

  • Viral infections and diseases

Session Introduction

Dr. Derara Girma

Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Salale University, Fiche, Ethiopia

Title: Depression and associated factors among HIV-positive youths attending antiretroviral therapy clinics in Jimma town, southwest Ethiopia
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: Depression is recognized as a prominent health problem and a growing public health concern in HIV-positive youths. Despite this fact, in Ethiopia, there is a dearth of evidence on the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among HIV-positive youths. Methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 16 to June 01, 2020, among 331 HIV-positive youths attending antiretroviral therapy clinics in Jimma town. A systematic random sampling technique was used to enroll study participants. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression was done to identify factors associated with depression. Variables with a p-value ≤0.25 on the bivariable analysis were candidates for multivariable analysis. Adjusted odds ratios with the respective 95% CI were calculated and p-value <0.05 were used to set statistically significant variables in the multivariable analysis. Results: Out of a total of 331 sampled HIV positive youth, 325 have participated in this study with a response rate of 98.2%. The prevalence of depression was 30.2% (95%CI:25.2%-35.1%). Female sex (AOR = 4.12, 95%CI:2.28–7.47), history of hospital admission (AOR = 2.45, 95%CI:1.28–4.70), discontinued education due to HIV/AIDS illness (AOR = 2.09, 95%CI:1.12–3.90), poor treatment adherence (AOR = 2.23, 95%CI:1.04–4.78), opportunistic infections (AOR = 2.16, 95%CI:1.17–3.97), high baseline viral load (AOR = 3.35, 95%CI:1.82–6.16) and ≤6 months duration of HIV diagnosis (AOR = 3.14, 95%CI: 1.47–5.72) were factors significantly associated with depression. Conclusion: This study demonstrated a high prevalence of depression among HIV-positive youths. Factors such as female sex, treatment non-adherence, opportunistic infections,

  • Viral Vaccines

Session Introduction

Dr. Md Naushad Khan

Department of Biotechnology, School of Chemical and Life Sciences Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, INDIA

Title: CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS: MOLECULAR DIAGNOSIS AND PERSPECTIVE TREATMENT
Biography:

Dr. Md Naushad Khan has completed his M.Phil. and Ph.D. from India at Jamia Millia Islamia and Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi. I have published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and have been serving as an editorial board member and reviewer of repute. I also achieved the National Eligibility Test, Department of Biotechnology Junior Research Fellow, Indo-US Human Immunity to Chikungunya Virus project Staff and Senior Research Fellow from Indian council of Medical Research etc. 

Abstract:

The Chikungunya disease is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes a massive epidemic in the Indian Ocean and other geographical regions. It causes the first epidemic outbreak in Europe, basically Emilia-Romagna in the north-east of Italy between July and September in the year 2007. The number of cases definitely raised these Islands and a million of peoples in India were affected. Greater than 15 fold increases Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) seropositivity when travelers to epidemic regions have returned to the UK. Acute infection of CHIKV associated with fever, joint pain, and chronic rheumatism. The viral RNA is the first marker detected usually by RT- PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) with a specific 294 base pair primer in the sample within 7-8 days of symptom onset. The CHIKV infection is diagnosed with CHIKV specific IgG and/ or IgM serology. Sequencing studies can determine the mutation and the infecting genotype. There is no specific antiviral; physicians simply recommend rest and plenty of fluids. Over-the-counter medication will help ease joint pain and fever. These include naproxen, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen and for longer-lasting aches, physiotherapy may helpful. Currently, there is no vaccine but in general the CHIKV disease short-lived and rarely fatal. The National Institute of Health (NIH) is currently funding a clinical trial of the chikungunya vaccine including VLPs (virus-like particles) rather than inactivated or weakened viruses. This presentation explores the differential diagnosis and perspective for chikungunya treatment. Further, discuss the efficiency of these treatment regimens and the scope of future direction.

 

  • Human Virology and Infectious Diseases

Session Introduction

Dr. REN-JYE

Graduate Institute of Microbiology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Title: Inhibition of flavivirus infection by human ZFP36L1 protein mediated by both XRN1 and RNA exosome
Biography:

REN-JYE LIN has completed his PhD at the age of 35 years from National Defense Medical Center (MDMC), Taiwan and postdoctoral studies from Institute of Biomedical Sciences (IBMS), Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan He is the director of National Mosquito-Borne Diseases Control Research Center, National Health Research Institute, Taipei, Taiwan. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

Zinc-finger protein 36, CCCH type-like 1 (ZFP36L1), containing tandem CCCH-type zinc-finger motifs with an RNA-binding property, plays an important role in cellular RNA metabolism mainly via RNA decay pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that human ZFP36L1 has potent antiviral activity against influenza A virus infection. However, its role in the host defense response against flaviviruses has not been addressed. Here, we demonstrate that ZFP36L1 functions as a host innate defender against flaviviruses, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and dengue virus (DENV). Overexpression of ZFP36L1 reduced JEV and DENV infection, and ZFP36L1 knockdown enhanced viral replication. ZFP36L1 destabilized the JEV genome by targeting and degrading viral RNA mediated by both 5¢-3¢ XRN1 and 3¢-5¢ RNA-exosome RNA decay pathways. Mutation in both zinc-finger motifs of ZFP36L1 disrupted RNA-binding and antiviral activity. Furthermore, the viral RNA sequences specifically recognized by ZFP36L1 were mapped to the 3'-untranslated region of the JEV genome with the AU-rich element (AUUUA) motif. We extend the function of ZFP36L1 to host antiviral defense by directly binding and destabilizing the viral genome via recruiting cellular mRNA decay machineries.

 

Dr. REN-JYE

Graduate Institute of Microbiology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Title: Inhibition of flavivirus infection by human ZFP36L1 protein mediated by both XRN1 and RNA exosome
Biography:

REN-JYE LIN has completed his PhD at the age of 35 years from National Defense Medical Center (MDMC), Taiwan and postdoctoral studies from Institute of Biomedical Sciences (IBMS), Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan He is the director of National Mosquito-Borne Diseases Control Research Center, National Health Research Institute, Taipei, Taiwan. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

Zinc-finger protein 36, CCCH type-like 1 (ZFP36L1), containing tandem CCCH-type zinc-finger motifs with an RNA-binding property, plays an important role in cellular RNA metabolism mainly via RNA decay pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that human ZFP36L1 has potent antiviral activity against influenza A virus infection. However, its role in the host defense response against flaviviruses has not been addressed. Here, we demonstrate that ZFP36L1 functions as a host innate defender against flaviviruses, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and dengue virus (DENV). Overexpression of ZFP36L1 reduced JEV and DENV infection, and ZFP36L1 knockdown enhanced viral replication. ZFP36L1 destabilized the JEV genome by targeting and degrading viral RNA mediated by both 5¢-3¢ XRN1 and 3¢-5¢ RNA-exosome RNA decay pathways. Mutation in both zinc-finger motifs of ZFP36L1 disrupted RNA-binding and antiviral activity. Furthermore, the viral RNA sequences specifically recognized by ZFP36L1 were mapped to the 3'-untranslated region of the JEV genome with the AU-rich element (AUUUA) motif. We extend the function of ZFP36L1 to host antiviral defense by directly binding and destabilizing the viral genome via recruiting cellular mRNA decay machineries.

 

Biography:

Dr.Opito has completed his Bachelor’s in Medicine and Surgery (MBchB) from Gulu University, Uganda and subsequently completed a Masters’ in Public Health from Busitema University, Uganda. He has 9 years of experience in HIV clinical care, supervision and project management in a resource limited and post-conflict setting. He has championed quality improvement and operational researches in his work. He has 2 publications in the field of HIV innovative approaches. He is currently the Centre Program Manager of TASO Soroti Centre of Excellence, Uganda whose main mandate is to provide HIV prevention, care and treatment services to a population of 1.2million people in Teso region, Eastern Uganda.

 

Abstract:

Uganda adopted the HIV test and treat policy in 2016. The treatment outcomes of this new intervention has not yet been assessed at program level. The objective of this study was to determine the treatment outcome of the HIV test and treat intervention in TASO Tororo Clinic, Eastern Uganda. Methodology: This was a retrospective cohort study using secondary data. The study involved 580 clients who were newly diagnosed HIV positive in TASO Tororo clinic between June 2017 and May 2018, who were then followed up for ART initiation, retention in care, viral load monitoring and viral load suppression. The data was analyzed using Stat 14.0 version statistical software application. Results: Of the 580 clients, 56.5% (328) were females while 93.1% (540) were adults aged ≥20 years. The uptake of test and treat was at 92.4% (536), while 12 months retention into care was at 78.7 %( 422). The factors associated with retention in TASO Tororo care were a) being counselled before ART initiation, AOR 2.41 (95%CI, 1.56-3.71), b) availability of treatment supporter, AOR 1.57 (95%CI, 1.02-2.43) and having an opportunistic infection at baseline, AOR 2.99 (95%CI:1.21-7.41). The viral load coverage was 52.4% (221) of the retained clients and viral load suppression rate was 89.1% (197) of clients monitored. There was a marked difference in non-suppression rates between children <20 years and adults ≥20 years (40.9% Vs 7.5%, P<0.001) and age <20 years was the only identified factor associated with vial load non suppression, AOR of 7.35 (95% CI=2.23-24.24). Conclusion: This study found the test and treat policy a great intervention in bringing new HIV positive clients on treatment. The study also found good vial load suppression rates among clients who took up test and treat intervention. There is however need to design interventions to improve retention and viral load coverage for clients who are initiating ART under test and treat policy.

 

  • Microbiology

Session Introduction

Dr.Hamed Haddas Kashani

Hamed Haddad Kashani, Anatomical Sciences Research Center, Basic Sciences Research Institut, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Title: Dual and mutual interaction between microbiota and viral infections; a possible treat for COVID-19
Biography:

Abstract:

All of humans and other mammalian species are colonized by some types of microorganisms such as bacteria, archaea, unicellular eukaryotes like fungi and protozoa, multicellular eukaryotes like helminths, and viruses, which in whole are called microbiota. These microorganisms have multiple different types of interaction with each other. A plethora of evidence suggests that they can regulate immune and digestive systems and also play roles in various diseases, such as mental, cardiovascular, metabolic and some skin diseases. In addition, they take-part in some current health problems like diabetes mellitus, obesity, cancers and infections.

Viral infection is one of the most common and problematic health care issues, particularly in recent years that pandemics like SARS and COVID-19 caused a lot of financial and physical damage to the world. There are plenty of articles investigating the interaction between microbiota and infectious diseases. We focused on stimulatory to suppressive effects of microbiota on viral infections, hoping to find a solution to overcome this current pandemic. Then we reviewed mechanistically the effects of both microbiota and probiotics on most of the viruses. But unlike previous studies which concentrated on intestinal microbiota and infection, our focus is on respiratory system's microbiota and respiratory viral infection, bearing in mind that respiratory system is a proper entry site and residence for viruses, and whereby infection, can lead to asymptomatic, mild, self-limiting, severe or even fatal infection. Finally, we overgeneralize the effects of microbiota on COVID-19 infection. In addition, we reviewed the articles about effects of the microbiota on coronaviruses and suggest some new therapeutic measures. 

 

  • Infectious Diseases

Session Introduction

Dr. Hyunjo Kim

School of Pharmacy, Yonsei University,South Korea

Title: COVID-19 Pandemic Simulation Studies
Biography:

Hyunjo Kim has completed her PhD at the age of 35 years from Temple University, USA and Postdoctoral Studies from School of Medicine, Ajou University, Korea. She is the Director of R&D center, a premier Bio-medicine Industrial organization. She has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Irish Publishing.

Abstract:

COVID-19 was identified as the causative virus of pneumonia based on unknown etiology. COVID-19 has multiple characteristics distinct from other infectious diseases, including high infectivity during incubation, time delay between real dynamics and daily numbers of confirmed cases, and the intervention effects of quarantine and control measures. Public health concerns are being paid globally on how many people are infected and suspected reach to pandemics. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a mathematical model to estimate the transmissibility and dynamic of the transmission of the virus.