Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th World Congress on Virology and Infectious Diseases Tokyo , Japan.

Day 2 :

Conference Series Virology Asia 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiuqing Wang  photo
Biography:

Dr.Xiuqing Wang received her Ph.D. degree in virology/pathobiology at the University of Connecticut. She did postdoctoral work in Dr. Stephen Dewhurst’s laboratory in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Rochester medical center. Dr. Wang’s lab is primarily focused on viral pathogenesis, viral immunity, and vaccine development. The main research topic areas include the better understanding of the innate immunity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and innovative approaches for novel vaccine development against these devastating diseases. We primarily use primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells and MARC-145 cells as an in vitro model system to study virus-host interaction and innate immunity. We are particularly interested in the role of type I interferon and interferon induced genes such as protein kinase R (PKR) in virus replication. We are also assessing the role of stress granules in PRRSV and PEDV replication.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus with a genome size of approximately 15 kb. PRRSV belongs to the Arteriviridae in the order of Nidovirale. PRRSV causes acute respiratory disease in neonatal and young piglets and reproductive failure in pregnant sows. The role of PRRSV nonstructural and structural proteins in modulating the transcriptional activation of type I interferon in MARC-145 cells and human cell culture system including HeLa cells and 293T cells has been described previously. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction between PRRSV and host’s innate factors including type I interferon, interferon-induced genes such as protein kinase R (PKR), and stress granules. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and MARC-145 cells were used to study the virus-host interaction. Real-time RT-PCR, RNA silencing, western blotting, ELISA, and TCID50 were used to understand the strategies used by PRRSV to evade host’s innate defense mechanisms. Findings: PRRSV activates the transcription of type I interferon in porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells. However, PRRSV interferes with the translation of type I interferon in these cells partly through cytopathogenicity since UV and heat-inactivated viruses lose their ability to interfere with the induction of type I interferon by porcine Poly I:C. PRRSV transiently activates PKR during early infection. PKR is not a major contributor to the phosphorylation of eIF-2a, but it plays a pro-viral role in PRRSV replication. PRRSV fails to induce stress granules in infected MARC-145 cell. PRRSV interferes with the formation of stress granules formed by treatment with arsenite sodium. Conclusion & Significance: PRRSV has evolved multiple strategies to evade host’s innate immunity. A better understanding of the virus-host interaction may provide novel insights on the design of innovative strategies to control and prevent the devastating disease in pigs.

 

Keynote Forum

Nikolai Nosik

D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology ,Russia

Keynote: Inactivation Kinetics of DNA- and RNA- Viruses by Ozone-air Mixture in a flow mixer

Time : 10:30-11:00

Conference Series Virology Asia 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nikolai Nosik photo
Biography:

Dr Nosik Nikolai N. Graduated from Moscow Medical University in 1956, physician. In 1959 completed the Post Doc course at the D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology  Acad. Med. Sci. USSR and received PhD degree in virology. 1988 – Doctor of Science (virology), 1990-  Professor. Since 1959 have been working at the D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology  Russian Acad of Med. Sciences. the head of the laboratory. From1968 till 1973 was working for the WHO and as an WHO Expert in virology in SEARO (India) on national and international projects on virology and epidemiology.  Main activity was connected with poliomyelitis in India and afterwords was conducted to enteroviruses in South-East Asia Region (India, Nepal, Burma, Thailand).In 1975 as a visiting scientist was doing the research  study on oncornaviruses  at the National  Institute of oncology in Fort Detrick, Maryland, USA. In 1976 and 1978 as visiting scientist was involved in the study on interferons (ISERM program) in Paris, France. Since that time main scientific interests have been connected with interferons , immunomodulators and antiviral preparations, antiviral immunity, cytokines and ctr.At present my research  focuses on  the prevention of viral diseases ( inactivation of pathogenic viruses  with chemical and physical means (UV, ozone)) as well as studies  on antivirals  (natural and synthetic origin  - betulin derivates, Fullerene derivates and others).

 

Abstract:

Virucidal activity of ozone is well known: dissolved in water it kill viruses very fast. The virucidal capacity of ozone in ozone-air mixture is less known.  The goal of the study was to investigate the virucidal potentials of the ozone–air mixture and kinetics of virus inactivation.

Materials and methods-Ozone (O) was generated from oxygen with ozonizer ( 1.0 – 75.0 mgl). The  ozone concentration was determined by the spectrophotometric methods. Virus contaminated samples were placed into the flowing reactor. Viruses: poliovirus type 1, vaccine strain (Sabin) and adenovirus, type 5, were obtained from the State virus collection. Titrations of viruses were carried out in appropriate cell cultures. CxT value    ( mgl x min) was calculated.

Results-Metallic, polycarbonic and fiber “Kevlar” samples were contaminated with virus, dried and treated with ozone-air mixture in the flowing reactor. Kinetics of poliovirus inactivation: in 15 min  at 5.0 mgl -2.0 lg TCID50 inhibition , in 15 min at 10 mgl – 2.5 lg TCID50 , 4.0 lg TCID50 inactivation of poliovirus was achieved after 75min at ozone concentration 20.0mgl (99.99%). ( CxT = 75, 150 and 1500 mgl x min on all three types of surfaces). It was found that  the inactivation of poliovirus was more effective  when the virus contaminated samples were wet (in 15 min at 20mgl inhibition of virus in dry samples was 2.0 TCID50 , in wet samples – 4.0 TCID50). Adenovirus was less resistant to ozone treatment then poliovirus: 4.0 lg TCID50  inhibition was observed after 30 min of the  treatment with ozone at 20mgl ( CxT mgl x,min = 300 for adenovirus as for poliovirus it was 1500).

Conclusion-It was found that ozone-air mixture inactivates viruses at rather high concentrations (compared to the reported effect of   ozone dissolved in water). Despite  of that there is a difference in the resistance to ozone action between viruses – poliovirus is more resistant then adenovirus -  ozone-air mixture can be used for disinfection of large rooms. The maintaining of the virus contaminated surfaces in wet condition allow to decrease the ozone load for virus inactivation.

 

 

Conference Series Virology Asia 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker K.Nagamani photo
Biography:

Dr.K.Nagamani has completed her MD Microbiology from Dr.NTR University of Health University. She is the Professor and Head of department of microbiology, Gandhi Medical College, Secunderabad, Telangana State, India. She has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an peer reviewer of repute journals.She is Nodal officer for State level Virology lab and for multidisciplinary research unit at Gandhi medical college.She has worked as a Principal Investigator in the projects such as “Molecular Epidemiology of Norovirus Infected children under 5years of age” and on an  International Project, a collaborated work between Stanford University and Gandhi medical college titled “Understanding Community - Associated Antimicrobial Resistance”.Her keen interest is on virology that would help her contribute her best to the fields of Medical Virology and Immunology, thus making a difference to the society.

 

Abstract:

Noroviruses (NoVs) are the main viral agents in acute diarrhea outbreaks and sporadic cases for all age groups worldwide. Noroviruses are considered fast-evolving viruses and present an extensive diversity that is driven by acquisition of point mutations and recombination. Since the mid-1990s, six global epidemics have been documented and each has been associated with the emergence of a new GII.4 variant. US 1995-1996 virus, Farmington Hills 2002 Virus, Hunter 2004 virus, Pandemic strains Den Haag 2006b and Yerseke 2006a, New Orleans 2009, Sydney 2012. Despite this extensive diversity, a single genotype (GII.4) has been shown to be the most prevalent in humans worldwide. Thus, the present study was aimed to determine the molecular epidemiology, prevalent genotypes and phylogenetic analysis of norovirus infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic children less than five year of age in Hyderabad region, India.

Methods:The stool samples and clinical data were collected from 458 children less than 5 years of age comprising of cases with acute gastroenteritis (n=366) and control group (n=92) admitted to the paediatric ward.The study was approved by Institutional Ethical Board.All the samples were tested for Norovirus antigen detection by sandwich-type ELISA and nucleic acid detection byRT-PCR and sequencing was done for predominant strain.

Results:Of the total study group (n=458), (n=366) are cases and (n=92) are control group. A 8.7% (n=32) of cases and 3.2% (n=3) of control group were found to be Norovirus positive by ELISA method. 19.6% (n=90) children has taken rotavirus vaccination. Disease severity was found to be with less than 9 episodes of loose stools (p<0.05), 6-7 episodes of vomiting (p<0.05), mild dehydration, and abdominal pain were observed in cases. Prevalence of Norovirus infection was found to be 10.3% by RT-PCR. Predominant genotypes were GII-82.5% (n=33) followed by GI-12.5% (n=5). Phylogenetic analysis of genotype GII was done for 20 samples by MEGA6 software by maximum-likelihood tree were two cluster of Norovirus GII.4 was observed. The cluster was distinct from remaining GII.4 variant were 18 belong to one and 2 belong to another sub cluster.

Conclusion:Emerging of new GII.4 variant was observed in this study. Monitoring and proper diagnosis is needed to reduce the burden of illness due to Norovirus and detection of emerging new Norovirus variants.

 

  • Deadly viral diseases

Session Introduction

Marina Nosik

I.I. Mechnikov Research Institute of Vaccines and Sera ,Russia

Title: Aged people with newly diagnosed HIV
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Marina N. Nosik is doing research in AIDS since 1985.    She worked during the outbreaks of HIV-infection in different regions of former Soviet Union. She had formed the   State collection of HIV-isolates circulating in the territory of the former USSR.  In 1988-1989 as the visiting scientist undergone training in Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (Baltimore) and in FDA, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (Rockville) in 2009. Main scientific interests at present:  HIV drug resistance; characterization of HIV isolates circulating in the territory of the Russia and former Soviet republics; TB/HIV-co-infection. She is the Head of Laboratory of Biology of Lentiviruses, I.I. Mechnikov Institute for Vaccines and Sera, Moscow, Russia. She has two Government Awards for the work in the field of biology and health protection.  Publications:  7 issued patents, over 100 deposits of HIV-strains in the State Collections of Viruses; 1 monograph; 64 publications in the peer-reviewed journals.

 

Abstract:

The growing number of people aged 50 years and older, who are living with HIV becomes a significant public health problem. Worldwide an estimated 3.6 million people aged ≥50 years are HIV-infected. However still few data are available regarding newly diagnosed HIV and contexts of HIV-infection among older adults. The goal of the study was to obtain data regarding the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of people aged 50 and over, who were newly diagnosed with HIV.  Data were collected over the period of 2015-2016 years from a large medical center, Department for treatment of TB/HIV patients.  Epidemiological and clinical data were collected and analyzed as part of a descriptive study.Out of 570 HIV positive patients who attended the clinic over 2015-2016 years 410 patients were newly diagnosed (ND) with HIV. The most prevalent age group   among ND was 30-39 years (88,9%). The ratio of persons aged ≥50 among ND was 11,2%(n=46); 54,3% were males. Out of 46 newly diagnosed aged people 43,5%(n=20) individuals were of age ≥56 years.   Out of aged ND 34,8%(n=16) patients had CD4 cell count below 350 cells/mm³ and 43,5%(n=20) had CD4 cell count below 200 cells/mm³. Median CD4 cell count in group 23-49 years was 329 cells/mm³(57÷929 cells/mm³). There were differences in HIV risk factors in the older compared to younger age groups: injection drug use(IDUs) was the risk factor identified for 46,2% of the age group 23-49 years versus 17,1% in older group; heterosexual route of HIV transmission was 51,9% in group of 23-49 years and 82,9% of those age ≥50; men who have sex with men accounted for 1,9% of the younger group and none in the older.Thus a very high proportion of individuals aged ≥50 are diagnosed with HIV at an advanced stage of disease. Also a rather alarming finding is that the predominant mode of HIV transmission in older people is heterosexual contacts (82,9%)  comparing with younger people who acquired HIV both through needle-sharing and heterosexual contacts. It is essential for healthcare providers to implement special education programmes targeting older population, including implementation of HIV screening guidelines in primary care settings.

 

  • Viruses and Tumours
Speaker
Biography:

Yoshinori Hayakawa has graduated Tokyo University, Department of Applied Physics. He received Ph.D. in Tokyo Institute of Technology. He then engaged in Boron-Neutron-Therapy in Teikyo University and then Proton Radiation Beam Therapy in University of Tsukuba. He has Measured first in the world acoustic pulse generated in the patient’s body treated by pulsed proton beam. The phenomenon will be used to monitor dose distribution in patients as planed or not. He then become a professor in Toin University of Yokohama. He is now retired. He is interested in researches on well being of human life. He has developed Computer Numerals and New Abacus Numerals for improving basic education to reduce poverty. He has developed Universal Literacy Alphabet as well.He is now developing a plan  to eliminate  glacial period by reflecting sun light by mirrors on the moon surface and Lagrangian points of moon orbit.

 

Abstract:

New influenza pandemic might kill 300 million people in the world. Ordinary vaccines are too costly for many people in    developing countries. Moreover vaccines are not available in early stages of pandemic.

Preparation Method:

Ferret nasal mucosa is carcinized using carcinogen for easiness of incubation. Bird influenza virus is attenuated by reverse genetics. The virus is marked by green fluorescent protein. This attenuated virus is sprayed to many cultured cancer cell specimen incubated. In some specimen attenuated virus will mutated to increase in cancer cells, checked by green fluorescence. Then the virus is tested to infect ferret and then human volunteers without serious symptom. Virus with strongest virus titer to infect ferret is selected as seed virus of infectious attenuated live vaccine. The seed virus will be increased in incubated cancer cells by bioreactors all over the world and sprayed to vulnerable people, e.g., soldiers, students, people in slams, medical staffs, and people engaged in lifeline. Drones may be used to enhance infection, spraying in slams and markets thin capsules including the live vaccine. Thin capsules are melted at human nasal mucous membrane. Thus basic immunity is gained by many people against dangerous virus.Artificial pandemic of dangerous virus as H7N9, H5N1 etc., are to be created serially with few years interval. Artificial pandemic should  be initiated before wild type pandemic starts. One reason is to avoid reassortment (mixture) of virus RNA and another is to avoid clinical and social confusion. It should not overlap with influenza season. The number of victims seems to be less than one thousandth of wild type pandemic. The calculation assumes the number of victims with infectious attenuated live vaccine is less than that of A/H1N1.  Similar technique cannot be used for creating biological weapon as toxic virus kill cancer cells for incubation.

 

 

  • Veterinary virology
Speaker
Biography:

Muhammad Awais has completed his PhD at the age of 30 year from Huazhong Agricultural University China .Now he is doing job as Assistant Professor at the university of Animal Sciences Lahore Pakistan. He has Published 8 papers in well reputed journal.

 

Abstract:

Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an emerging highly fatal pathogen which could induce zoonose. JEV is generally transmitted by infection carrying mosquitoes, inducing Japanese encephalitis (JE). It’s the first critical step in the initiation of innate antiviral responses to effectively recognize JEV. Toll Like Receptor 7 (TLR7) and Toll Like Receptor 8 (TLR8) are the members of the family of Toll-like receptor, which can recognize single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and activate immune cells that can produce downstream cytokines for immune clearance. As a single - stranded positive sense RNA virus, the relation between JEV infection and TLR7/8 remain unclear. In previous study, it was found that the expression of TLR7 in the brains of C57BL/6 mice observably increased after JEV-infection. However, we found that the survival ship of TLR7 deficient mice was not significantly changed as compared to C57BL/6 mice after JEV infection. And the expression of TLR8 observably increased in the brains. Thus, further study was done on TLR7 deficient mice to explore whether the expression of TLR8 played a role in the TLR7 deficient mice during innate antiviral responses after JEV-infection and detect the expression of TLR8 in CNS. Brain tissues were embedded as paraffin sections after that the mice were infected with vaccine strain SA14 -14 -2 or virulent strain P3. The pathological changes were observed in the brain of JEV-infected brain tissue with hematoxylin eosin staining (HE staining), and viral load and expression of TLR8 in the barin of JEV-infected TLR7 deficient mice were detected by Immunofluorescence. The results demonstrated that there was plentiful co-localization of TLR8 and JEV E-protein in the brains of JEV-infected TLR7 deficient mice without disease symptoms, but there was little co-localization in the brains of JEV-uninfected TLR7 deficient mice. Since the TLR8 is highly homologous to TLR7, it’s possible that TLR8 plays a role as compensative function to recognize ssRNA of JEV and activate downstream signal pathway to produce a series of inflammatory and type I interferon for immune clearance in the absence of TLR7.

 

  • Posters
Speaker
Biography:

Md. Shahed-Al-Mahmud has his expertise in about bacteriophagology. I am working as master’s students on Prevention and degradation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation by Phage ɸAB6 and its tail fiber protein on Microbiology and Immunology department of school of Medicine at Tzu Chi University. My aim is to find out a new therapeutic way to prevent biofilm formation and biofilm degradation will open a new chapter in medical science.

 

Abstract:

Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacillus and undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections with clinical implications like urinary tract infection. Although A.baumannii biofilms are a growing concern in a broad range of areas, the biofilm degradation of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is essential for new therapeutic treatment option of nosocomial infections in the hospital environment. A number of reports have demonstrated that it can form biofilms on several biotic and abiotic surfaces, providing the bacteria with protection against antibiotic treatment and the host immune defenses in vivo. During the last decades, the use of virulent bacteriophages has re-emerged for therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of phage ɸAB6 and its tail fiber (TF) protein to prevent and degrade the biofilm of MDR A. baumannii. The TF gene was ligated with pET28a, then transformed into E. coli for protein expression. In this study, eight ɸAB6 susceptible clinical isolates of A. baumannii examined for biofilm forming ability. The biofilm formation assay observed at different periods of time (24h, 48h, and 72h) on 96 well microtiter. The observation of some clinical isolates of A. baumannii produced more biofilm up to 72h. However, we only highlighted strain AB54149 biofilm forming ability using light microscopic observation up to 7 days. The biofilm degradation assay, we find out that the effective degradation ability by phage ɸAB6 was 65% whereas, TF protein degrade ability was 55%. In biofilm prevention assay, markedly prevent biofilm formation by phage ɸAB6 78% while TF protein prevents 62%. On the other hand, biofilm inhibition assay also endorsed the potential biofilms inhibition ability by phage ɸAB6 92% while its TF protein inhibits 61%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed that the impact of phage ɸAB6 and its TF protein have the ability to change the morphology of AB54149 in silicon coated Foley catheter. These findings suggest that the treatment of phage and its tail fiber protein is a promising therapy to prevent and degrade A. baumannii biofilms.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Hyun Jeong Kim has completed her Ph.D. from College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University in Korea. She is the veterinary researcher of Foreign Animal Disease Research Division at Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency (APQA). She has published more than 23 papers on bovine and porcine pathology, epidemiology, molecular biology and anti-microbe strategy in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

Bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of the genus Orbivirus in the family Reoviridae, contains ten segments (S1 to S10) of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). To date, 27 BTV serotypes have been characterized, and two major geographical groups (eastern and western topotypes) of BTV have been circulating globally. In Korea, BTV-1/KorL83915 strain was first isolated in 2012 when a pilot study was carried out to investigate the BTV status of Korea. Subsequently, from 2013 to 2014, 6,542 blood samples that collected from cattle (5,447) and goat (1,095) were  obtained from 1,485 farms across 10 provinces In this study, the BTV strain was newly isolated and different from the serotype that was reported in a previous study. Based on the nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis, the VP2 gene of the virus was characterized as serotype 3 and the gene belongs to nucleotype B and eastern topotype. According to the phylogenetic study, the VP2 and VP5 genes of the Korean BTV-3 isolate was closely related to the Japanese BTV-3 and four genes (S1, S3, S5 and S7) were with the Taiwanese BTV-12 strain. The remaining S4, S8, S9 and S10 segments were clustered with Chinese BTV-16, BTV-4 and BTV-1 and Taiwanese BTV-2, respectively. Although it is unclear how the virus had been formed and introduced into South Korea, the virus might be emerged in Asian countries through vigorous reassortment and movements of infected hosts and/or biological vectors have to be considered. For better understanding of the virus ecology and transmission mechanism, international cooperation and more extensive monitoring on hosts as well as on vectors should be needed.

 

Wei Yong

Nanjing Municipal Center for Disease Prevention and Control ,China

Title: Cronobacter sakazakii, a potential cause of food-borne outbreak
Speaker
Biography:

Wei Yong has completed her PhD in 2011 from Nanjing Medical University. She is the chief assistant of Microbiology Department in Nanjing Municipal Center for Disease Prevention and Control. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

 

 

Abstract:

In October 2016, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) affecting 156 cases in a local senior high school was reported. We carried out epidemiologic, microbiologic, and molecular investigations to identify the causative agent and contamination source of the outbreak. A case control study that included randomly selected 70 case-patients and 295 asymptomatic student controls was conducted. One hundred and seven clinical and foods/environmental samples were collected and 6 strains of Cronobacter sakazakii were recovered following conventional bacterial isolation procedure. The isolates were further identified and compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). MLST results targeting seven loci (atpD, fusA, glnS, gltB, gyrB, infB and pps) and phylogeny of whole genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms (wgSNPs) were obtained to traceback the potential contamination source in this outbreak. The epidemiological evidence indicated a strong association between eating supper at the school canteen on the day of the outbreak onset and having acute gastroenteritis, as revealed by the Odds Ratio (OR: 95.32) from the case-control study. C. sakazakii Isolates S2 from a patient’s rectal swab and S4 from a leftover food sample shared identical PFGE pattern and were both identified as sequence type (ST) 73, and clustered together in the wgSNP phylogeny. Isolates S1 and S3, from 2 patients’ rectal swabs separately, shared another same PFGE pattern and both belonged to a newly defined sequence type 567. Isolates S5 and S6, both from swabs of food delivery boxes, were identified as ST4 with different PFGE patterns from each other. The interesting feature of this study was the implication of C. sakazakii as a causative agent in food-borne AGE occurring in healthy adults, although C. sakazakii is considered as an opportunistic pathogen and generally affects neonates, infants and immuno-compromised adults.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Sanjaykumar S. Tikute has completed Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Microbiology from Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, India. He is pursuing his Ph.D. in Microbiology and working as Senior Technical officer at National Institute of Virology, (ICMR), Pune, India. He has expertise in virus isolation, IHC technique, animal experimentation and also in outbreak investigations.

 

 

Abstract:

Coxsackie virus A-16 CVA-16 is one of the major etiological agents to cause hand, foot and mouth disease, among children. Severity of the disease might cause clinical manifestations leading to the neuronal involvement. Studies conducted earlier in India revealed circulation of CVA-16 as a major enterovirus (EV) type associated. Despite, no attempts have been made to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of CVA-16 strains isolated from HFMD. The present study highlights the pathogenesis and molecular aspects of CVA-16 strains isolated from HFMD cases using neonatal mice model. ICR mice were inoculated with CVA16/311 virus by intraperitoneal route (I.P.) and were harvested at different time-points. Histopathological evaluation, CVA-16 specific antigen detection, viral kinetics using complete VP1 gene amplification of different organ tissues, nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was carried out. CVA-16/311 infected mice showed clinical symptoms of weight loss, difficulty in movement, hind limb paralysis on day 5 of P.I.D. Hind limb muscles showed severe necrosis, dissolution of muscle fiber cells, infiltration of inflammatory cells, neuronal degeneration in brain. High level expression of CVA-16/311 viral antigen in limb muscles, brain, heart was observed. Viral kinetics studies revealed presence of CVA16/311 sequences in the organ tissues from day 5-7 of P.I.D. Phylogenetic analysis of full VP1 gene showed presence of B1c subgenotype. To the best of knowledge, such study is reported for the first time from India.

 

Eva Bártová

University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences ,Czech Republic

Title: Serologic Survey of Selected Viral Pathogens in Free-Ranging Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) from Slovakia
Speaker
Biography:

Eva Bártová has completed her PhD in 2003 and habilitation in 2010 both from University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno. She is assoc. prof. at Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, FVHE, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno. She has published 125 paper, 40 of them in journals with IF with 296 citations, her H-index is 10. She had contributions at 68 conferences and she had wrote 75 oponent reviews.

 

Abstract:

The aim of study was to test sera of bears from Slovakia for antibodies to 10 viral pathogens.  Similar study, in free-ranging European brown bears (Ursus arctos), has been performed only in Croatia and Italy. The sera were collected from 24 free-ranging brown bears killed for public safety reasons in six various regions of Slovakia between years 2011 and 2015. We tested sera by Indirect fluorescence antibody test for antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine adenovirus (CAV), canine parainfluenza virus type 2 (CPIV-2) and canine herpesvirus type 1 (CHV-1). We used Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV), bluetongue virus (BTV), West-Nile virus (WNV) and Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV). We detected antibodies to CDV in seven animals (29 %), antibodies to CHV in three animals (13 %), antibodies to CPV-2 and CPIV-2 in two animals (8 %), while antibodies to CCV, WNV and ADV in one animal (4 %). To our knowledge, this is the first report of CCV and ADV exposure in free-ranging brown bears.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ms. Xuezheng Ma is a research associate in the Institute of Health at ChineseAcademy of Inspection and Quarantine (CAIQ) since 2010. She completed her M.Sc.degree in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry program from Simon Fraser University,Canada. Ms. Ma received her B.Sc. in Biology from Saint Mary’s University inCanada. She has been worked in Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre in aprogram of bioinformatics. Her working experience provided a combination skill fordry-lab data analysis and wet-lab experiments. Her current research includesinfectious disease surveillance, prevention and control; development of influenzarapid diagnostic methods for international travelers; and the detection of severeendemic infectious disease in the borders of China.

 

Abstract:

Background:

The mass gathering of pilgrims has a high global health risk for the global concern that travelers returning from pilgrimage could contribute to the international spread of MERS-CoV. In China, about 11,000 Muslim pilgrims participate the Hajj gathering in Mecca annually. This is the first report for MERS-CoV and respiratory viruses detection results at points of entry in China from 2013-2015.

Case Presentation:

A total of 847 returning hajj pilgrims participated in this study. The test result indicated that 34 Influenza A, 14 Influenza B, 2 Metapneumo Virus, 2 Respiratory Syncytial Virus, 3 Human Coronavirus positives were tested from travelers with fever. The statistical analysis showed there was a significant difference between participants with or without fever. The positive rate of influenza virus was 5.3%, 6.0% and 6.3% among 2013-2015. However, there was no significant difference among three years for respiratory virus positive participants.

Conclusions:

The MERS-CoV and respiratory viruses detection results at points of entry in China from 2013-2015 indicated there was lack of MERS-CoV infection but the prevalence of influenza viruses in Chinese pilgrims.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Liu lijuan, Female, PhD in epidemiology and health statistics, professor of Institute of Health Quarantine, Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, engaged in the study on prevention and control of external infectious disease.

 

Abstract:

A total of 264 stocked sera of the travelers came from the Southeast of Asia (SEA) and South America (SA) in 2014 was used to detect Zika virus (ZIKV) by molecular and serological methods, so as to assess whether the previous neglected ZIKV infection carried in the international travelers. The results showed although no ZIKV RNA found in the stocked sera, however, 5.3% of the samples were positive for anti-ZIKV IgG. The epidemiologic study showed ZIKV infection was related with age and gender significantly (p<0.05), affecting the relatively young and femalepopulation. The travelers who infected ZIKV were consistent with the reported endemic areas. It’s deduced that the international travelers might be as a sentinel for surveillance the ZIKV international transmission